ACTIONETIX | Carbohydrates for Performance

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I’m going to shed light on carbohydrates and how you can incorporate them into your eating plan for top results. I’m going to dispel a number of misconceptions about “carbs” and teach you that they are not only essential to life, but one of the greatest performance enhancers when used properly. Knowing the right types of carbohydrates to eat at the right time can literally change your performance for the better, so I’m here to help you understand the ins and outs of how and when to use them.

Don’t Sugar Coat Things!

Let’s start with setting the record straight about exactly what a carbohydrate is – sugar. Carbohydrate may be a fancy word that scientists use, but all in all any carbohydrate is sugar. Carbohydrates can be known as simple or complex, with a simple sugar being a small, quickly processed molecule where a complex carbohydrate is a much bigger, slower processing molecule. Regardless of whether you eat a simple or complex carbohydrate, your body breaks it down to a very simple form of sugar called glucose. So, let’s say you eat a commonly known carbohydrate such as a potato. The carbohydrates that are stored in the potato will be broken down in your body to supply usable energy in the form of glucose. The same holds true for pasta, rice, bread and even table sugar – they all end up as glucose in your body. This basic energy source can then be used to not only fuel your muscles during training and racing, but is also used by your brain as its primary fuel. Carbohydrates are very important for you to understand if you want to perform at your peak because of their necessity for mental and physical exertion.

The Glycemic Index

Most people, when asked can name at least five foods that mostly are made up of carbohydrates: pasta, rice, bread, potatoes and fruit are not only common answers, but also correct as well. Carbohydrates mostly come from plant-based foods. Animal based foods such as meats are mostly comprised of protein and fat and are low in carbs (milk does have a fair amount of carbs in it however). Each type of carbohydrate does have a specific “speed” at which it is converted to glucose. The measurement of this speed is known as the Glycemic Index or GI for short. Pure glucose is the standard by which other carbohydrates are measured and it has a GI value of 100, which is a fast absorbing carbohydrate. Any carbohydrate with a GI value under 50 is considered a slower, longer-term energy provider, while foods between 51 and approximately 75 are good general energy providing carbohydrates. Finally carbs with a GI rating between 76 and 100+ are short-term energy providers. Each type of food has its place in helping athletes perform at their best.

What Carbs to Eat and When

Now that you have a basic understanding of exactly what a carbohydrate is, the next step is to look at specific foods and their GI values and ultimately when to eat them so they help you maximize your performance in the gym and on the track. Below is a list of common carbohydrates, their specific GI value and a recommended time to eat them:

Carbohydrate Source GI Value Recommended Timing/Use
Potato, Wite,  with Skin 69 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Potato, White, no Skin 98 Used after training or riding for quick recovery
Potato, Sweet 48 Used before training or riding for sutained energy
Rice, White ~70 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Bread, Whole Wheat ~72 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Bread, Rye ~55 Used before training or riding for sustained energy
Pasta, White ~45 Used before training or riding for sustained energy
Pasta, Whole Wheat ~45 Used before training or riding for sustained energy
Oatmeal, Instant ~83 Used after training or riding for quick recovery
Oatmeal, Porridge 42 Used before training or riding for sustained energy
Banana ~55 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Cantaloupe 67 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Strawberries 40 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Carrots, Raw 16 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Carrots, Boiled 33 General purpose carb for before or after training/riding
Gatorade 89 Used after training or riding for quick recovery

Note: How you prepare your foods, including the method of cooking as well as sauces that may be added can change the GI values significantly. For a full list of individual food, go to www.glycemicindex.com

Getting it Dialed In

Just like the bike you race, your body needs quality fuel if it is to perform at its peak. Knowing what type of carbohydrate to eat and at what time will give you a distinct advantage over your completion on and off the track. My athletes generally eat five custom-designed meals each day so they can maximize their efforts during training, practice and racing. Incorporate these principals into your day to day routine and you will quickly see the positive benefits. If you are interested in having a custom-made nutrition plan designed specifically for you, or just have any questions in general, feel free to reach out to us at info@actionetix.com, and don’t forget to check out all of the articles on training, nutrition and supplementation at www.ACTIONETIX.com.